Recent Statistics on Car Accidents in Texas

Recent Statistics on Car Accidents in Texas

Although overall it appears that the roads and highways of Texas are getting safer, recent research indicates that there is still a long way to go in the Lone Star State when it comes to reducing crash-related injuries and deaths.

The following are some statistics on Texas motor vehicle accidents from 2013, the most recent year complete data has been made public:

  • The fatality rate on Texas roads was 1.4 deaths for every 100 million miles traveled by vehicles throughout the state. This number was a 2.78 percent decrease from 2012.
  • The total death toll from motor vehicle fatalities in 2013 was 3,377, down from the total of 3,413 in 2013.
  • About 65,500 crashes in Texas led to serious injuries, with a total of 89,270 people sustaining these injuries.
  • The majority of traffic fatalities (1,883, or 55.76 percent) occurred in rural areas.
  • 767 people were killed in accidents at intersections, and 523 were killed in head-on collisions.
  • There was not a single day in 2013 without a traffic-related death in Texas.
  • The deadliest day was March 23, 2013, which saw 27 people killed in traffic accidents. The deadliest month was June, which had 336 traffic deaths.
  • One reportable crash occurred every 71 seconds in the state. Additionally, one person was injured every two minutes and 16 seconds, and one person was killed every two hours and 36 minutes.
  • There were a total of 485 pedestrian fatalities in 2013, a slight decrease from 2012. There were also 48 bicyclist fatalities in 2013, a 14.3 percent reduction from 2012.
  • Of the 3,377 total traffic deaths in 2013, 1,089 came in accidents where someone was driving under the influence of alcohol, and 460 involved distracted driving crashes.

If you have been injured in a car accident, contact an experienced Houston attorney at Cire Law Firm. Call us today at 713.532.6206 or contact us online to learn more about your options.

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